Tips for resume for the job application

It is wrong to think of your resume as a history of your past, as a personal statement or as self-expression. Indeed, most of the content of any resume is focused on your job history. But communicate to create interest, to influence the employer to hire you. If you write with that purpose, your final output will be quite different from writing to inform or list your job history.

Most people write a resume because everyone assumes that you ought to have one to get a job. They write their resume grudgingly to fulfil this obligation. Drafting a resume is only slightly above filling out income tax forms in the hierarchy of worldly pleasures. Suppose you understand that a great resume can be your ticket to getting precisely the job you desire. In that case, you may be able to gather some genuine interest for creating an absolute masterpiece, rather than the feeble results most people produce.

The good news is that with a little more effort, you can produce a CV that will set you out as a favoured candidate for a job you want. Not one resume in a hundred adheres to the criteria that pique the interest of prospective employers. So, even if you are up against a stiff competition with a well-written resume, you should be invited to interview more frequently than many others who are more qualified than you.

Set aside at least three hours (this is the usual amount of time it takes to complete a resume assuming everything goes well). Before you begin, print off the following notes and tape them to your computer, the wall next to your desk, or somewhere else you’ll see them throughout the process.

Resume Tips:

Your CV should focus on your future rather than your past.

It’s not a place for confessions. In other words, you are not required to disclose every detail. Stick to what is appropriate and marketable.

Don’t write a list of job specifications. Write accomplishments!

Promote only skills you appreciate using. Never write about something you don’t want to repeat.

Be honest. You can be creative, but don’t lie.

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